Spring: Inconsistent as Usual

Striped squill (Puschkinia scilloides), Siberian squill (Scilla siberica) and crocus bloom before last week’s snowstorm.

Spring in Minnesota is as fitful as ever — in other words, it’s one of the few things that remains normal during the pandemic. A week ago, Saturday was sunny and 70 degrees. Honey bees explored the squill patch and the first bloodroot blossoms unfurled white and gold. Twelve hours later, a cold front settled over the state. More than five inches of heavy, wet snow buried the garden and coated every bud, twig and trunk. Fox sparrows scratched and dug under the garden hedge sending snow, leaves and dirt flying behind them. A chubby American robin plucked the few remaining crabapples from a small tree. When the air warmed above freezing midweek, a few flowers were wilted and tinged with brown, but those that still had a covering of snow perked right up.

Sticky snow transformed a greening world back to winter black and white.

Traces of snow linger in the shady, northern corners of the yard, but most areas look like spring again — for now. While almost all of Minnesota’s record-breaking April snowstorms have occurred mid-month or earlier, that’s not always been true. Remember that April 29-30 storm in 1984? It dumped 9.7 inches of snow on the Twin Cities to close out the month. It’s all part of a typical Minnesota spring. Here’s a look at what’s growing in the backyard now that the snow has melted.

Bright green moss and its spore capsules are a refreshing sight after the snow.

Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) is one of the earliest spring wildflowers to bloom in Minnesota. Each flower is wrapped in a single leaf before opening.

A honey bee (Apis mellifera) in the Siberian squill is the first one I spotted this year.

A northern magnolia (Magnolia stellata) bud, slightly frostbitten, unfurls on a milder day.

Baby leaves and bud clusters of Canada cherry (Prunus virginiana).

7 thoughts on “Spring: Inconsistent as Usual

  1. Welcome back to Minnesota Beth! I love your photos and the names of plants I have also seen on my almost-daily walks this spring. Blue skies and sunshine provide a powerful reason to head outdoors! Thank you Beth! Keep up your Nature, Garden, Life blog… it is an inspiration to me!
    🌷Stephanie Allyn

  2. So beautiful. I love reading and “moving with you” through your observations. You notice and share so much and I love to savor the beauty as I hear your voice in the writing. This calms me in this crazy time when hours of work preparing for the kids threaten to overwhelm me. Your naturegardenlife gives me a safe haven to regroup and ready myself to “hit the trenches” again!

  3. Pingback: Spring Ephemerals: Hepatica – Nature, Garden, Life

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